If certain personalities are meant for specific job positions, should it also follow that your character should fit your desired occupation? 

It’s something that a 2019 study in the Netherlands tried to answer. The research showed that knowing your personality type, interests and work preferences can help you find a suitable job that can contribute to career development and pave the way to success.

During job employment, an employer determines a candidate’s personality through a series of personality tests like the Big Five Personality Test, 16 Personality Factors Questionnaire, Color Code Personality Assessment and DiSC Personality Profile. These tests measure traits and assess character and behaviors in various situations that can be essential to the position. The most popular personality test commonly used by companies called the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator has received numerous criticisms, even from psychologists, owing to results that are limited to binary oppositions and don’t consider external factors and mood variations.

The most common results that appear in personality tests are interpersonal traits that are classified into three categories, namely introvert, extrovert and ambivert. These personality traits play an important role in the workplace, giving you insights on how you work with other people, so knowing which classification you belong to will help you determine your ideal job and workplace. 

These personality traits play an important role in the workplace, giving you insights on how you work with other people, so knowing which classification you belong to will help you determine your ideal job and workplace.

INTROVERT

Introverts are usually more focused and productive when doing individual work compared to a collaborative environment. A remote work setup might be more effective for them since they are self-motivated learners. They are workers who tend to toil at their own pace and don’t need external validation or stimulation to function.

When it comes to leading however, introverts don’t get as many opportunities as extroverts. A survey in the UK found that extroverted people have a 25 percent higher chance of landing a high-paying, managerial job than introverts. 

But as Susan Cain, author of “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking,” said on her viral TED Talk, introverts are more careful and take calculated risks in making decisions. According to research, introverted leaders listen carefully to suggestions and allow employees to make their own decisions. A stark contrast to extroverted counterparts who tend to intimidate employees during meetings and brainstorming.

EXTROVERT

Extroverts are fueled by interpersonal interaction and don’t get intimidated when put in a large crowd. They have excellent communication skills and prefer face-to-face interaction and video calls to emails. They thrive in collaborative meetings, socializing in events, and even parties or concerts. They are more productive in traditional offices or shared working spaces where they can interact with other people.

“If you’re motivated to achieve a goal at work, if you’re feeling positive, and if you’re good at dealing with people, you’re probably going to perform better on the job,” the study authors stated. 

Extroverts are said to be natural-born leaders because they can easily get along with people and aren’t shy to express their ideas. In a recent study done by analyzing existing scientific studies about the impact of extroversion to a workplace, it was found that extroverts are more inclined to be successful because of emotional, interpersonal, motivational and performance-related advantages. “If you’re motivated to achieve a goal at work, if you’re feeling positive, and if you’re good at dealing with people, you’re probably going to perform better on the job,” the study authors stated. 

AMBIVERT

According to Carl Jung, there’s no such thing as a pure introvert or a pure extrovert. And if a person falls in the middle of the personality trait spectrum, then they’re an ambivert. 

Ambiverts both enjoy working alone and engaging with other people. They can speak their minds and reserve their thoughts. They adapt based on the situation—basically possessing chameleon-like traits and behaviors. If they feel they should be more outgoing at a client meeting, they can do so and if they feel it’s time to listen, then they can instantly tone it down.

Understanding how you react to certain instances can help determine what kind of working environment you’ll thrive in.

The key to knowing if you are an ambivert is self-awareness. For example, your ideal working environment doesn’t depend on how many people you need to interact with as long as you are able to do your work. Understanding how you react to certain instances can help determine what kind of working environment you’ll thrive in. Surprisingly, around 68 percent of the world’s population are ambiverts. 

If job seekers consider what kind of environment works best for them, it may be easier to narrow down the options for a potential job. So upon reading the job description and requirements for a position you’re applying for, think about how your personality will work and blend with a company’s work culture.

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