F&B

The name of this restaurant literally translates to “get so drunk you lose a shoe”

Hediu Grill Station is a “chill and grill” concept that promises a tipsy time

Photos by Samantha Ong

Hediu Grill Station doesn’t pretend to be anything more than what it is—a “chill and grill” restaurant, according to Human Resources Manager Jess Estiva, that encourages its customers to go home drunk after feasting on its wide selection of Sichuan cuisine.

This restaurant is hardly a place for the faint of heart. It doesn’t attempt to be upscale like many restaurants in Manila. While there’s no shame in that, there’s also no shame in putting out a concept with a Chinese name that literally translates to “down it until you lose a shoe.” In Filipino, that would be, “Inom ka pa.

Stir fried spiced cray fish
Grilled squid
Grilled shrimp

With most of the dining population composed of people with nine-to-five jobs, concepts like Hediu are exactly what the market has been looking for. While refined establishments are highly admired in the industry, restaurants like Hediu show that you don’t need clout to be appreciated by the market. If anything, places like Hediu are a breather, a safe space, and a comfort zone for those looking for a respite from the hectic city life.

Walwalan is something that transcends all cultures and languages, so it’s no surprise that more and more Filipinos are discovering this little gem located by the bay. While it’s the concept that attracts the customers, it’s the food that makes them stay—and come back.

Grilled oyster
Twice-cooked pork belly

Specializing in Sichuan cuisine (pronounced sishwan), Hediu’s menu is headed by Chinese chefs and cooks who make sure the dishes are as authentically Sichuan as they can be while still adapting to local tastes and trends. One such way Hediu has done that is its adoption of the quintessentially Filipino preference for skewers. An entire menu section is dedicated to spiced meats on barbecue sticks, all of which are flavored to the taste of Sichuan spices.

One of the great eight cuisines of China, Sichuan is distinct in its spiciness, which comes from the abundance of garlic and chili peppers in its recipes. The hot element of Sichuan cuisine stems from the province (of the same name)’s cold climate, which required its people to create dishes that would keep them warm.

Counter clockwise starting from the top left: Stir-fried elephant shell with garlic, Garlic broccoli, Twice-cooked pork belly, Grilled pork, Yang chow fried rice, Grilled squid, Grilled oyster, Grilled beef, Yang chow fried rice, Grilled shrimp, Iced okra, Sichuan spiced nail shell. Center: Stir-fried spiced cray fish

In 2011, the capital of Sichuan, Chengdu, was recognized as a “City of Gastronomy,” and it’s clear why. By nature, Sichuan cuisine offers a level of gastronomic sophistication no matter where or how it’s served. Whether that’s in a five-star restaurant or a chill and grill concept, Sichuan cuisine promises a delicious time—especially when that’s partnered with alcohol in a restaurant that’s all about drinking the night away.

The SM Mall of Asia branch of Hediu Grill Station is located on Sunset Boulevard in Pasay City. It’s open from 4pm to 6am.

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